Grant Stone Sizing Guide: Comparing Every Grant Stone Last

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by  William Barton | Last Updated: 

I love Grant Stone boots. 

I have the Brass in Black CXL, the Diesel in Crimson CXL, and the Chelsea in Dark Oak Roughout, and I get plenty of wear for each of them. 

But I’ve noticed that they don’t all fit the same. And when I picked up the Chelsea’s, I got the same size as my Diesel and Brass, but I should’ve gotten a half-size smaller. 

That’s when I knew a guide could be helpful for you, too. 

So I’m going to share my experience with Grant Stone sizing and break down the subtle differences between their various lasts so you can get the perfect fit for your new boots. 

Everything You Need To Know About Grant Stone Sizing

model wearing Grant Stone Chelsea boots in roughout leather
Wearing my Grant Stone Chelsea in Dark Oak Roughout

The Grant Stone Diesel is up there in the running for my favorite boot I own (check out the video below where I rank over 30 pairs of boots in my collection…spoiler alert: the Diesel is at the top).

Most Grant Stone boots are built on their Leo last, which fits similarly to Alden and most other heritage boot brands. 

Grant Stone Diesel

The Grant Stone Diesel is a no-frills mid-weight boot built with superb attention to detail and materials. The quality is comparable to other boot makers who retail for $450-600, but the Diesel is much less expensive. It’s one of the better price for value buys you’ll find.

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I wear a size 10D, and I tend to think I have the most average feet of all time. I wear the same exact size in Red Wing, Thursday, Wolverine, Timberland, Wesco, Nicks, Whites, etc. I just always get a size 10D and it works out well for me. 

With sneakers and dress shoes, I’m always a 10.5. 

So my general sizing advice for Grant Stone is to get a half size smaller than your sneaker size. And if you’re shopping for Grant Stone, my guess is that you’ve already had some experience with other boot brands, so you probably already have a bit of an idea of how you like your boots to fit. 

I’ve noticed that Grant Stone fans are in the know, so to speak. 

But I’ll talk about how the different lasts fit my feet, plus try to give some insight as to how the wider sizes fit.

Leo Last

Grant Stone Diesel profile view closeup
Wearing my Grant Stone Diesel in Crimson Chromexcel

The Leo last is Grant Stone’s most popular fit. Their Diesel, Ottawa, Edward, Chukka, and Cap Toe are all built on the Leo. 

So if you’re shopping for multiple Grant Stone pairs, it makes it easier: once you find your size, you can just repeat. 

In my experience, the Leo last fits very similarly to most boot brands. It’s a half size larger than true sizing (i.e. order a half size smaller than your dress shoes and sneakers). 

Grant Stone makes their E and EEE widths proportional, so if you order an E width, it’s slightly longer. For example, a 10E will be a bit longer in the toe than a 10D. This is true for all Grant Stone lasts. 

Because their lasts are proportional, a person with a sneaker size of 10.5 could likely get a 10D or a 9.5E. You’d have enough length in the toe in the 9.5E to fit, you’d have a more snug fit in the heel, but you’d still have some room in your forefoot. 

Grant Stone Diesel

The Grant Stone Diesel is a no-frills mid-weight boot built with superb attention to detail and materials. The quality is comparable to other boot makers who retail for $450-600, but the Diesel is much less expensive. It’s one of the better price for value buys you’ll find.

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Floyd Last

Grant Stone Brass boot sole whie walking
Wearing my Grant Stone Brass in Black Chromexcel

Grant Stone uses their Floyd last for the Brass boot, which sits at the top of my list for the best winter boots:

The Floyd last fits similarly to the Leo. To use myself as an example again: I got the 10D for my Brass boots and they fit just as well as my 10D Diesel. 

But the Floyd certainly has more vertical room in the toe. 

For the Leo, I mentioned that someone with a 10.5 sneaker could likely get a 9.5E, but I wouldn’t give that same advice for the Floyd. There’s naturally a little more room in the forefoot with the Floyd last, plus you get the extra quarter-inch or so of space at the top of your toe. 

So I’d say that the Floyd last (the Brass boot) fits just slightly larger than the Leo last. Not enough to warrant getting a completely different size, but my Brass boots are more roomy. 

I like this aspect because I usually only bust out my Brass boots in winter, whereas I wear my Diesel’s year round. 

I’ve found that I can wear a thicker pair of socks with the Brass and the little extra padding makes my Brass boots feel just like my Diesel’s. 

Grant Stone Brass Boot

The Grant Stone Brass boot is a total beast. The construction and stitching is meticulous and the build quality is the best I’ve experienced. While I personally prefer a slightly slimmer style, there’s no denying that the Grant Stone Brass Boot is one of the best value-offers in boots today.

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UK Last

Grant Stone Chelsea on steel stair background 1

Grant Stone uses their UK last for their Chelsea boots, and this is where I found the most significant sizing difference.

In my experience, the UK last is significantly larger than the Leo and Floyd last. 

I ordered the 10D (like I did with the Brass and Diesel). I’ve found that my heel knocks around a bit and there’s a bit too much room at my forefoot. If I were to order my Chelseas again, I’d try a 9.5E. 

The UK last is also longer than their other lasts, so the standard “half-size down” advice will likely leave you with an inch of room at the toe. I’m comfortable with that much room at the front of my foot, but it also allows the opportunity to get an even more snug fit in the heel without cramping your toes.

Because the UK last (the Grant Stone Chelsea) is longer than most boots, I recommend getting a full size smaller than your usual sneaker size. And if you’re worried about your foot getting cramped at the ball of your foot, try getting the wider E width. 

Grant Stone Chelsea Boot

If you’re all about value-for-money and you’re looking for a high end Goodyear welted Chelsea boot for everyday wear, then the Grant Stone Chelsea is the boot for you.

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EEE Width

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I haven’t talked about the wide widths yet, but as someone who recommends boots all day long, I love the fact that Grant Stone carries E and EEE widths. 

You probably already know if you have a wide foot. Most people with a wide foot experience either pinching or just a general cramped feeling in their forefoot with standard D width boots and regular sneakers/dress shoes. 

If you’re not sure whether you should get a wide size or not, stick to the D and E widths. 

EEE width is only for people who know they have a wide foot. If you’ve ever ordered a EE boot from Red Wing, Thorogood, or any other boot brand, then you’ll want to order a EEE from Grant Stone. 

The EEE offers much more room in the instep and at the forefoot, so it’s a great choice for those who almost always feel cramped in their boots. 

Like the E width, a EEE width is slightly longer than a D width, too (so a 10EEE is longer in the toe than a 10D). 

Heel Slip

model walking in Grant Stone boots Diesel

I want to add a final note on heel slip, as I’ve noticed that nearly every boot I own that’s Goodyear welted or stitchdown and is made with a leather insole develops some heel slip at some point during the break in.

For me, it’s usually week two: everything’s groovy at first, but during the second week, my right foot develops some heel slip. 

I’m pretty used to it at this point, so I just power through for about two more weeks and it usually works itself out. 

I’ve noticed that because Grant Stone boots are made with such high quality materials, they tend to feel heavy in the heel (all that beautiful stacked leather). This can exacerbate the intensity of the heel slip, though it’s never gotten so bad for me that I’ve ever gotten a blister wearing my Grant Stones. 

You can rub the inside of the heel with a dryer sheet if the heel slip is really bothering you. That helps increase the friction between your sock and the leather of the heel so there’s less rubbing.

But my advice is this: if you didn’t have significant heel slip to begin with, but you’re noticing it more after a week or two—just keep breaking them in, so long as it isn’t too uncomfortable to wear. 

Find Your Fit

If this is your first pair of Grant Stone boots, you’re in for a treat. 

They’re one of my favorite brands, and I think they offer some of the best value for money you can find. 

Personally, my favorite is the Diesel: it’s such a versatile look and I love to watch the Chromexcel leather age. 

Grant Stone Diesel

The Grant Stone Diesel is a no-frills mid-weight boot built with superb attention to detail and materials. The quality is comparable to other boot makers who retail for $450-600, but the Diesel is much less expensive. It’s one of the better price for value buys you’ll find.

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But the Brass is up in the running, too. Though it definitely has the look and feel of a winter boot, so I don’t wear it as often as my Diesels. 

Grant Stone Brass Boot

The Grant Stone Brass boot is a total beast. The construction and stitching is meticulous and the build quality is the best I’ve experienced. While I personally prefer a slightly slimmer style, there’s no denying that the Grant Stone Brass Boot is one of the best value-offers in boots today.

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I also like my Grant Stone Chelsea boots for everyday wear, but I found that the larger size and looser fit has me gravitating toward other boots first. 

That’s why I wrote this guide in the first place: so you can find the perfect fit the first time, and because different styles have minor fit differences that are important to know about before hitting the buy button.

FAQs

What widths do Grant Stone offer?

Grant Stone carries a D and E width in almost all of their boots, and certain leather options also have a EEE width available.

What Grant Stone boots use the Leo last?

The Diesel, Ottawa, Edward, Cap Toe, and Chukka boot are all built on Grant Stone’s Leo last.

Are Grant Stone boots Goodyear welted?

Grant Stone boot all use Goodyear welted construction.

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