facebook tracking

BootSpy is supported by readers. When you buy through our links, we may earn a commission. Learn more.

 /  Columns /  Vetted

Parkhurst Boots Review: Hands-on with the Parkhurst Allen

William Barton
Expertise:

Boots, Leather, Heritage Fashion, Denim, Workwear

William founded BootSpy in 2020 with a simple mission: test and review popular men’s boots and give a real, honest opinion. Since then, we've welcomed over 5 million readers on our boot reviews and boot care guides. Reach out to him for your own personalized boot recommendation at william@bootspy.com. Or join 50,000+ subscribers on the BootSpy YouTube channel, or send him a message on the BootSpy Instagram. Read full bio.


Last Updated: Apr 3, 2024
8 min read

It’s not hard to find Parkhurst fanboys online. Sure, they have a loyal following, but how do Parkhurst boots stack up against other brands in such a competitive niche?

In my Parkhurst boots review, I picked up a pair of the plain-toe Allen boots to find out if this brand is any good.

Review Feature Image/Icon Image Source: Parkhurst Brand website
Parkhurst
At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon

Bottom line: Parkhurst has earned their loyal following. The Allen is exceptionally well built and the materials and construction are a phenomenal value for the cost. Parkhurst’s last shape (the shape of the boot) is really unique. It’s longer than most other boots and retains a slim appearance while still leaving room for the ball of your foot. If you like a slimmer style, then you’ll love Parkhurst.

Ratings: At a Glance Feature Image/Icon  Design At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon  Quality of Materials At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon  Craftsmanship At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon  Fit & Sizing At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon  Value for Money At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon At a Glance Feature Image/Icon
Pros:
  • Everything from the materials to the construction quality and finishing is really well done
  • The price is outstanding considering what you get---other brands charge in the mid-$400’s for this (and even those are exceptional value)
  • I got the Allen in Rust Waxy waxed suede and I love how it’s been aging
Cons:
  • I really enjoy the longer toe box, but if you prefer a wider, stubbier look in your boots, you might find these too slim.

Once a week, it seems like my Instagram feed fills up with boot collectors who have five or more pairs of Parkhurst boots. 

It got to a point where I couldn’t consider myself a true boot aficionado without learning more about the brand. 

So I picked up a pair of the Parkhurst Allen boots in Rust Waxy leather. I’ve been wearing them for a few months, and here’s what I think. 

Parkhurst Allen Overview

Parkhurst Allen worn and reviewed by bootspy

The Parkhurst Allen is the brand’s signature plain toe boots. I like that Parkhurst has a simple lineup for their collection.

They offer a plain toe boot (the Allen), a cap-toe, a moc toe, and a Chelsea. 

And within that narrow range, Parkhurst is very imaginative with their leather selection. Have you ever had a pair of moose leather boots? Yeah, me neither. 

I played it safer with the Allen in Rust Waxy, which is a waxed suede. You’ll see some pics of how it’s been aging over the past month and breaking in. It’s already starting to look great. 

Things to Consider Before Buying

Parkhurst Allen toe box view

The thing I’ve heard most about though is the magic of Parkhurst’s last (or the shape of the boot). 

And I must say, I agree—the Parkhurst last is awesome. The last used for the Allen is called the 602, and for me, it takes a lot of elements from other brands I love and mixes them together. 

It’s easiest to explain if you’re a bit familiar with other brands like Thursday Boots, Grant Stone, and Truman. 

Here’s the Parkhurst last compared with similar boots from each brand:

Parkhurst vs Grant stone vs Truman vs Thursday Last shape and fit comparison

Parkhurst boots are a few mm longer than these other three brands. And as you can see, they’re fairly narrow looking boots (this would be much more pronounced if I was comparing it to the Red Wing Iron Ranger, or some other much more stubby boot). 

But they don’t feel narrow when you’re wearing them. With that extra length, you get a slimmer look, but the ball of your foot actually sits at a pretty wide spot. 

The end result is that you get the style of a more narrow boot, with the comfort of a wider boot.

Parkhurst Allen

Parkhurst has earned their loyal following. The Allen is exceptionally well built and the materials and construction are a phenomenal value for the cost. Parkhurst’s last shape (the shape of the boot) is really unique. It’s longer than most other boots and retains a slim appearance while still leaving room for the ball of your foot. If you like a slimmer style, then you’ll love Parkhurst.

Check Price

My Hands-On Review

First Impression

Parkhurst Allen on model walking forward

Right away, I could tell these boots were exceptionally well made. They’re crafted using a split reverse welt, which is a form of Goodyear welt that both looks sturdy and has plenty of water resistance. You could absolutely use these as your everyday boots in all sorts of bad weather. 

Parkhurst boots used to be made in the USA, but apparently one day, the brand’s factory partner suddenly shut down with no warning. 

While I don’t have any hands-on experience with Parkhurst’s American-made boot line, I can say that the new Spanish-made boots are still exceptional in terms of craftsmanship. 

Parkhurst Allen walking down steps

Because of the unique last shape, the Parkhurst Allen is a fantastic casual boot. My own personal style has been trending to chunkier boots that pair well with straight leg jeans. That’s meant that I’ve been wearing slimmer boots like Thursdays or most Chelsea boots a bit less often. 

I think the Parkhurst Allen is nicely balanced between looking slim and modern, while still having enough heft to fit into a more mature wardrobe. 

Leather Quality and Care

Parkhurst Allen boots on model

My Parkhurst Allen boots are made with a custom Rust Waxy leather. 

This is a waxed suede developed by Parkhurst in tandem with a Spanish tannery. In the first few months of wearing these boots, I’ve really enjoyed this leather. 

The pictures you’re seeing show how this boot aged over the first month—I love how the suede texture is coming through as the wax wears off at the creases. 

It’s more subtle than a waxed roughout (which I also think is really cool), both in terms of how it creases and also how much contrast there is between the parts that have retained their wax and the parts where the original fiber is showing through. 

Parkhurst Allen fit and sizing detailas

When it comes to leather care, I’m not going to really do anything to the leather. As a waxed suede, it won’t need conditioning pretty much ever, and it’s not like I’m going to put a shine on these. 

The most I’ll do is give them a brush with a horsehair brush every so often if they start to get more dusty than I like. And add cedar shoe trees. Beyond that, these boots really don’t require much care at all. 

Sole

Parkhurst Allen sole tread design

Some of the best aspects of Parkhurst boots are in the parts you don’t see. 

Parkhurst does an excellent job sharing all the gritty details about what goes into their boots on their product pages. 

The Allen features a leather insole, leather midsole, and a heavy rubber lug outsole. It’s all brought together with a reverse split Goodyear welt (which has excellent stitching density). 

Parkhurst Allen sole detail while walking

You’re also getting a real veg-tanned heel counter, which means the heel is going to keep its shape basically forever and you don’t have to worry about the boot getting slumpy and suddenly becoming uncomfortable, which is something I’ve noticed on boots that only feature celastic in the heel.

Between the insole and midsole, there’s a bit of cork filler and a steel shank for stability as well. 

Parkhurst Allen

Parkhurst has earned their loyal following. The Allen is exceptionally well built and the materials and construction are a phenomenal value for the cost. Parkhurst’s last shape (the shape of the boot) is really unique. It’s longer than most other boots and retains a slim appearance while still leaving room for the ball of your foot. If you like a slimmer style, then you’ll love Parkhurst.

Check Price

Fit and Sizing

Parkhurst Allen on author william barton bootspy

Parkhurst recommends sizing a half-step down from your Brannock device to get the proper fit. However, I ended up getting my Brannock size (a 10.5D), and they fit fantastically

I’m usually a 10D in most brands, including Grant Stone, Truman, Thursday, and Red Wing. However, I’m rocking a 10.5D Parkhurst Allen and loving it. 

That said, I never complain about my boots. I know some guys are super particular about the fit of their boots. I’m not at all. 

Given that I’m wearing a half-size larger than what’s recommended, I’d say there’s a lot of room for forgiveness with your Parkhurst boots. 

Parkhurst Allen on model sitting

I don’t want to go against the brand’s own sizing guidelines because every boot brand gets hundreds or thousands of questions about their fit, so they put a lot of effort into communicating everything they can. 

I love that Parkhurst puts all the information possible out there, including how their last looks, and how their boots compare to other brands. 

Break-in Period

Parkhurst Allen break in and fit details

With the Rust Waxy leather, there really wasn’t much of a break in period. With any boot that has a leather insole and midsole, you’re going to have a bit of break in as your foot sinks into the footbed. 

So it’s not like you’re slipping on new tennis shoes, but if your fit is even close, you shouldn’t have any trouble breaking this leather in. 

What Do Other Reviewers Say?

Parkhurst Outfit Grid

It’s hard to find a negative review of Parkhurst online. And by hard to find, I mean I looked and didn’t find one. 

From professional reviewers to Reddit to reviews on the site, Parkhurst is consistent with their boots and customers report being happy with what they get. 

Parkhurst Alternatives

Grant Stone

Grant Stone Diesel packaging with bag on white background

Grant Stone offers the most compelling alternative to Parkhurst in my opinion. Comparing the Grant Stone Diesel and Parkhurst Allen, the Grant Stone is a bit wider and shorter. 

This can be really helpful if you prefer a slightly wider fit in your boots. 

The price between Parkhurst and Grant Stone is pretty similar, with most Grant Stone boots being around $30-$40 more expensive. 

With Grant Stone, you get a much wider variety of leathers, plus more selection on sizing

Truman Boot Co.

Truman boots on white background

If you want wacky leathers like waxed moose, there aren’t many brands that are so adventurous. 

Parkhurst is one, and Grant Stone treads those waters, too, from time to time. 

But nobody does it quite like Truman. Vince, the founder of Truman Boot Co. is a madman. I had to add Truman here because they’re the first brand that really embraced uncommon leathers. Just check out this powder blue waxed roughout boot. 

View this post on Instagram

Wild.

My Thoughts Overall

What I Like

  • Everything from the materials to the construction quality and finishing is really well done.

  • The price is outstanding considering what you get—other brands charge in the mid-$400’s for this (and even those are exceptional value).

  • I got the Allen in Rust Waxy waxed suede and I love how it’s been aging.

What I Don’t Like

  • I really enjoy the longer toe box, but if you prefer a wider, stubbier look in your boots, you might find these too slim.

Who is the Parkhurst Allen for?

The Parkhurst Allen is a fantastic boot if you like a slimmer style, but you want a boot that’s a little more “grown-up” and sophisticated than brands like Thursday. Of course, they cost more. But the quality certainly justifies the price.

The Verdict

I’m really impressed with my Parkhurst boots. The brand has a loyal following, which is richly deserved. 

While they’ve made some changes in their boots since moving production to a new Spanish factory, the construction quality has remained excellent.

I’ve really been enjoying the Rust Waxy suede leather—the way it’s been subtly aging makes it easy to put on with pretty much any outfit. Plus, I like that the last is a bit slimmer and longer than what you find from most other brands up above the $300 price point. 

Parkhurst boots represent a fantastic value for your money, and if you’re on the fence with them, I say go for it.

Parkhurst Allen

Parkhurst has earned their loyal following. The Allen is exceptionally well built and the materials and construction are a phenomenal value for the cost. Parkhurst’s last shape (the shape of the boot) is really unique. It’s longer than most other boots and retains a slim appearance while still leaving room for the ball of your foot. If you like a slimmer style, then you’ll love Parkhurst.

Check Price

FAQs

How does the Parkhurst 602 last fit?

The Parkhurst 602 last fits slightly large compared to Brannock sizing. It has a low instep, a tapered heel, and the toe box is an E-width. The arch is a tapered D-width also. Compared to other brands, the Parkhurst 602 is a bit longer, so it maintains a “slim” style while still allowing room at the ball of your foot.

COMMENTS

Leave a comment... Join the conversation

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Read More Columns