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Grant Stone Field Boot Review: A Boot Nerd Goes Outside

William Barton
Expertise:

Boots, Leather, Heritage Fashion, Denim, Workwear

William founded BootSpy in 2020 with a simple mission: test and review popular men’s boots and give a real, honest opinion. Since then, we've welcomed over 5 million readers on our boot reviews and boot care guides. Reach out to him for your own personalized boot recommendation at william@bootspy.com. Or join 50,000+ subscribers on the BootSpy YouTube channel, or send him a message on the BootSpy Instagram. Read full bio.


Last Updated: Apr 3, 2024
8 min read

The Grant Stone Field Boot is a fashion brand’s take on a classic outdoors work and hunt boot. But is Grant Stone playing out of their depth?

In my review of the Grant Stone Field Boot, I dive into my experience, plus what I think some other great alternatives are depending on what you need.

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Grant Stone Field
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Bottom line: The Grant Stone Field Boots has a unique style to it that you either love or you think looks terrible. Personally, I cuslike it as a camping and outdoors boot. But it’s an outdoors boot for a leather fanatic, because the Badalassi Carlo leather isn’t something you’ll find on other camping boots. Plus, it’s super comfortable and well built.

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Pros:
  • The Field Boot comes in several incredible leather options
  • The Floyd last gives a lot of room in the toe and is very comfortable
  • Construction quality is superb, especially considering price
Cons:
  • It’s not a true moccasin build, so it’s not fully ready for swamp hunts, but anything short of that extreme condition, you’re clear

The Grant Stone Field boot is a relatively new pattern from the brand, and it’s the most “rugged” style they’ve released to date. 

Grant Stone’s roots are intertwined a bit with Alden, a legendary north-eastern high-end dress shoe brand. As such, Grant Stone has always trended toward classic, dressy styles with their boots. 

But the Field Boot is a major departure. Built like a classic hunting boot, the Field has a moccasin style toe, with an additional panel of leather running along the front of the boot. 

It’s more like a 7” boot with a padded collar, and as of right now, all Field boots come with a custom wedge sole. 

Grant Stone Field Boot Overview

Grant Stone Field Boot profile view

Like all Grant Stone boots, you get a 360-degree Goodyear welt (flat welt, in this case), with an oak-tanned leather insole and midsole. 

A trademark aspect of Grant Stone is how perfect their stitching is, and how dense it is, too. A lot of people talk about stitching density, but that may mean nothing to you. Here’s a good comparison so you can see how stitching density can vary. 

Grant Stone Field Boot
Grant Stone on the left, and Nicks on the right. Check the stitching density of Grant Stone.

As you can see, Grant Stone stitches the heck out of their boots. And I’ve heard from a cobbler friend of mine who’d know that Grant Stone’s are hard to take apart, even when you know what you’re doing and you’re trying to take them apart. 

Grant Stone Field Boot

The Field Boot pattern is dedicated to the long weekends spent outdoors. It has the feel of a vintage leather hunting boot, utilizing stout leathers and the time-tested Goodyear-welt construction.

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My Experience and Review

First Impression

Author William barton wearing Grant Stone Field Boots

As someone who occasionally considers going boar hunting and goes fishing about 4 times a year, getting the Field Boot felt like an aspirational win. 

I like what the boot stands for. It’s a classic looking camp boot. Now, it’s made with what a lot of people would consider as a dress leather—or at least a leather that’s too “high end” to be beaten up. 

But to me, it’s a boot nerd’s best camping companion. While Grant Stone is mainly known for their dress boots, it’s clear you can wear this boot like any other outdoor boot and it’ll stay strong.

Grant Stone Field Boot image

I like the addition of the d-ring eyelets and the sueded collar. From a style perspective, these are rugged all the way. On the downside, you can’t wear these in a dressier situation like the Grant Stone Brass.

So if you want a more versatile moc toe, the Brass is a better option. 

But for purely rugged use, the Field has the build. I like the extra panel of leather sewn around the front of the boot—that’s a double layer to help stave off debris, stickers, and sharp sticks on the ground. This is especially great for the brambly underbrush of North Carolina. 

And the Field boot has an unlined shaft, which helps a lot with flexibility and comfort. It still has a kip leather lining throughout the rest of the vamp. To me, this is the best of both worlds. 

Grant Stone Brass Boot

The Grant Stone Brass boot is a total beast. The construction and stitching is meticulous and the build quality is the best I’ve experienced. While I personally prefer a slightly slimmer style, there’s no denying that the Grant Stone Brass Boot is one of the best value-offers in boots today.

Check Price Read Our Review

Leather Quality and Care

Grant Stone Field Boot profile on stairs

There are several leather options you can get with the Field Boot, and they’re all pretty tempting. 

There’s C.F. Stead Waxy Commander, Horween Chromexcel, Seidel Bison, C.F. Stead Kudu, Ostrich leather, and Badalassi Carlo Minerva leather. This is a rock-star lineup of leathers. 

You really can’t go wrong in terms of quality. 

Except ostrich leather. I think that stuff is ugly (but it is exceptionally strong). 

Grant Stone Field Boot leather crease

I chose the Badalassi Carlo Saddle Tan leather because I expected this to become my new camp and work boot. I have heavier work boots, but I rarely do anything strenuous, so heavy work boots are more than I need. 

I want to see how that more natural leather color ages over time.

While the photos you’re seeing here are after just a few months of wear, at this point, the leather had been creasing gently and developing a nice broken-in look. 

The leather is decently thick. It’s not like a PNW work boot with 8-9oz leather. This is more like a 5oz leather, which is still thicker than most standard boots, but it’s not so heavy that it’s uncomfortable at any point. 

Grant Stone Field Boot floyd last fit

Care for Badalassi Carlo leather is quite easy—I just brush my boots down with a horsehair brush when I get them muddy. Eventually, I’ll condition them lightly. But other than that, the only thing I really recommend doing is popping in a cedar shoe tree

That’ll help the veg-tanned leather insole stay supple and will draw moisture out of the boot from everyday wear. 

Sole

Grant Stone Field Boot sole detail

Grant Stone boots look beautiful on the outside, but they’re almost even better on the inside. Made with an oak-tanned leather insole and midsole, you’ve got years of wear in these puppies. 

The Field Boot has a custom wedge outsole glued to the midsole. The outsole isn’t wearing down as quickly as a Vibram Christy sole. But compared to the Vibram 2021 wedge sole I have on my Nicks, the Grant Stone wedge is a bit softer. 

Grant Stone Field Boot sole on stairs

Overall, I say the wedge neither gains nor loses any points. It’s solid. Also, wedge soles are just really comfortable in general. 

The Field has a flat 360-degree Goodyear welt, which has been flawlessly executed. 

Grant Stone Field Boot

The Field Boot pattern is dedicated to the long weekends spent outdoors. It has the feel of a vintage leather hunting boot, utilizing stout leathers and the time-tested Goodyear-welt construction.

Check Price

Fit and Sizing

model walking wearing Grant Stone Field Boot

Order a half size smaller than your Brannock and you’ll be fine. The Field is built on Grant Stone’s Floyd last.

This Floyd last has a decent amount of room in the toe, but not so much like a Red Wing where you can go a full size smaller and still be ok. 

Grant Stone Field Boot being tied by model

You can read my full guide to sizing Grant Stone boots, but here’s the TLDR:

Pretty much every Grant Stone boot fits a half size smaller than Brannock, which puts it in line with pretty much every major boot brand out there. The only difference is their Chelsea boot, which is built on their UK last, and that definitely runs big. 

For me, the Floyd last (which the Field Boot utilizes), has a bit more room in the toe and instep, so it’s just more comfortable in general.  

Break-in Period

Grant Stone Field Boot break in period

There was no discomfort during the break in at all. Of course, it takes a few weeks to break in the upper leather and get some “custom feel” in the outsole, so they do become more comfortable over time. 

But I doubt you’ll experience any discomfort, at least with the Badalassi Carlo leather.

Based on my experiences with Horween Chromexcel and C.F. Steady Waxy Commander, I doubt either of those will have an uncomfortable break in, either. I don’t have experience with Kudu leather, so that may be different. 

What do Other Reviewers Say?

View this post on Instagram

The Grant Stone Field Boot in Reverse Kudu is very comfortable. The Floyd last is generous and has lots of room in the toe box. No break in needed. I sized down one full Brannock.
-Vince, Stitchdown Shell

Grant Stone Field Boot Alternatives

Grant Stone Brass

Grant Stone Brass boot leaned against wall

The Grant Stone Brass is more versatile in the style-department. I have a version in the Black Chromexcel and it’s a great looking boot. 

They’re both built equally well, so you can wear the Brass as a beat-up work or camp boot if you wanted. I don’t think that’s it’s best use-case, but you certainly could. 

You don’t get the same style points from the Field Boot.

Grant Stone Brass Boot

The Grant Stone Brass boot is a total beast. The construction and stitching is meticulous and the build quality is the best I’ve experienced. While I personally prefer a slightly slimmer style, there’s no denying that the Grant Stone Brass Boot is one of the best value-offers in boots today.

Check Price Read Our Review

Russell Moccasin

View this post on Instagram

If you’re willing to almost double your spend, but you want a true outdoors moc boot with insane build and water-resistance, check out Russell Moccasin

They don’t have any true wedge sole boots, so in that regard, the Grant Stone Field might be more comfortable if you’re standing on flat ground more often. 

But if you want “the last camp boot you’ll ever need,” then Russell would be my choice. 

Russell Moccasin The Professional Hunter
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My Thoughts Overall

What I Like

  • The Field Boot comes in several incredible leather options. There are several all-star choices. 

  • The Floyd last gives a lot of room in the toe and is very comfortable.

  • Construction quality is superb, especially considering price.

What I Don’t Like

  • It’s not a true moccasin build, so it’s not fully ready for swamp hunts, but anything short of that extreme condition, you’re clear.

Who is the Field Boot for?

If you love beautiful leathers and you’re not afraid to beat an upper up from a top-notch tannery, then getting Grant Stone’s most rugged boot is the way for you.

The Verdict

The Field Boot is the most rugged Grant Stone boot right now, and I’m currently using it as my go to camping, fishing, and working boot. 

I love that it has the double-leather around the toe: that’s seriously helpful for the brush in North Carolina because there’s a lot of low vines that just shred everything they touch. 

Plus, I love that there’s no lining in the shaft of the boot—that makes it much easier to crouch down and check my smoker or poke the fire and not have so much material around the ankle. 

But I still get the kip leather lining around the rest of the vamp for both durability and comfort. 

Like every other Grant Stone boot I’ve tried, the build quality is outstanding. 

The Field is really comfortable right out of the box and continues to get more comfortable every time I wear them. 

If you want something more versatile, I’d pick the Brass. Personally, I like the style of the Brass more (it’s definitely more dressy). And I like the commando sole better than a wedge from a style perspective. That said, wedges are definitely more comfortable. 

The hardest choice you’ll have to make is your leather option. Every option Grant Stone offers is awesome. Good luck.

Grant Stone Field Boot

The Field Boot pattern is dedicated to the long weekends spent outdoors. It has the feel of a vintage leather hunting boot, utilizing stout leathers and the time-tested Goodyear-welt construction.

Check Price

FAQs

Grant Stone Brass Boot vs Field Boot

The Grant Stone Brass is more dressy. Plus you can get the commando lug sole vs the wedge sole. The Field has some features like the padded collar and lack of lining in the shaft that make it a bit more comfortable for outdoor activities like camping and fishing. But if I could only choose one, I’d opt for the Brass because of its greater versatility from a style perspective.

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